@DinahCraik

"I always write him kindly – & never say a word that he might not print in the Times” bit.ly/2vaRpz8

Dinah’s letters to Ben illuminate her difficult relationship with their eccentric & oftentimes volatile father – bit.ly/2vaRpz8

“Good Words pays me £5 per page ... & Mr Blackett gives for the 1st ed. if 2 vols: £500 – & half profits afterwards” bit.ly/2vaRpz8

New 8-page letter (!!) from Dinah Craik to her brother Ben Mulock, October 1860. Read it now on @TAPAS_Project bit.ly/2vaRpz8.

This way, Craik’s chosen publishers got her new work before it was pub. in the UK (and before other American publishers could reprint it!)

By sending American publishers early sheets of her work, Craik ensured proper payment for her intellectual property. bit.ly/2qYWZBC

New post on Craik’s reaction to H.Hunt’s The Finding of the Saviour in the Temple—“the grandest picture I ever saw" digitaldinahcraikproject.org/2017/05/24/the…

A new letter from Dinah Craik to Lady Drysdale just went up on @TAPAS_Project, bit.ly/2sa1luf

Have you read Kate Summerscale’s Mrs. Robinson’s Disgrace? Craik was friends with Lady Drysdale, Dr Edward Lane, & Mary Lane (of Moor Park).

New blog post on researching and encoding Victorian women in our Craik Site Index digitaldinahcraikproject.org/2017/05/24/wom…

When Once A Week was launched in 1859, Dinah Craik was incorrectly listed as a contributor. She was not impressed. bit.ly/2rDlnuE

Alfred Harral was with Dinah’s brother Ben Mulock during the Australian Gold Rush. Read her letter to Horace here: bit.ly/2rWSKvh.

Horace Harral was also a portrait photographer. See his photos of Charles Samuel Keene, Orrinsmith, & more @ the NPG bit.ly/2qU4Bdj

test Twitter Media - Horace Harral was also a portrait photographer. See his photos of Charles Samuel Keene, Orrinsmith, & more @ the NPG https://t.co/32YjdDTHHe https://t.co/UCId2OVBqw

Dinah Craik knew many London-based artists, including Horace & Alfred Harral. Both brothers were wood engravers for the Ill. London News.

Craik and her friends the Lovells saw the Great Comet of 1861 (C/1861 J1) from Hampstead Heath on June 30th. bit.ly/2r5Lb40

test Twitter Media - Craik and her friends the Lovells saw the Great Comet of 1861 (C/1861 J1) from Hampstead Heath on June 30th. https://t.co/USX0i5yQuR https://t.co/65j2cZi8ig

"It was visible two days & nights from Hampstead – smoke in the day – & coloring all the sky to the zenith at night” bit.ly/2r5Lb40

“They say nothing has been like it since the great fire of London” – Craik’s account of the 1861 Tooley Street Fire bit.ly/2r5Lb40

test Twitter Media - “They say nothing has been like it since the great fire of London” – Craik’s account of the 1861 Tooley Street Fire https://t.co/USX0i5hf6h https://t.co/NZguT1cqFV

“Like most Englishwomen of my generation, I have been fond of you half my life.” Craik to H. W. Longfellow, 1868 bit.ly/2rzo5Rs

test Twitter Media - “Like most Englishwomen of my generation, I have been fond of you half my life.” Craik to H. W. Longfellow, 1868 https://t.co/aEOfJnRmBv https://t.co/78ARihZqVy

Craik read (and loved) Gilchrist’s “Life of William Blake” while working as a publisher’s reader for Macmillan bit.ly/2q3RZeu